Don Carlos

Synopsis

[This synopsis is based on the original five-act version composed for Paris and completed in 1866. Important changes for subsequent versions are noted in indented brackets. First lines of arias, etc., are given in French and Italian].

 

Act 1

[This act was omitted in the 1883 revision]

The Forest of Fontainebleau, France in winter

A prelude and chorus of woodcutters and their wives is heard. They complain of their hard life, made worse by war with Spain. Elisabeth, daughter of the King of France, arrives with her attendants. She reassures the people that her impending marriage to Don Carlos, Infante and son of Philip II, King of Spain, will bring the war to an end, and departs.

[This was cut before the Paris première and replaced by a short scene in which Elisabeth crosses the stage and hands out money to the woodcutters; she exits without singing]

Carlos, coming out from hiding, has seen Elisabeth and fallen in love with her (Aria: "Je l'ai vue" / "Io la vidi"). When she reappears, he initially pretends to be a member of the Count of Lerma's delegation. She asks him about Don Carlos, whom she has not yet met. Before long, Carlos reveals his true identity and his feelings, which she reciprocates (Duet: "De quels transports poignants et doux" / "Di quale amor, di quanto ardor"). A cannon-shot signifies that peace has been declared between Spain and France. Thibault appears and gives Elisabeth the surprising news that her hand is to be claimed not by Carlos but by his father, Philip. When Lerma and his followers confirm this, Elisabeth is devastated but feels bound to accept, in order to consolidate the peace. She departs for Spain, leaving Carlos equally devastated.

 

Act 2

[This is Act 1 in the 1883 revision]

Scene 1: The monastery of Saint-Just (San Jerónimo de Yuste) in Spain

The scene takes place some time after Philip II and Elisabeth are married. Monks pray for the soul of the former Emperor Charles V ("Carlo Quinto"). His grandson Don Carlos enters, anguished that the woman he loves is now his stepmother.

[In the 1883 revision, he sings a revised version of the aria "Je l'ai vue" / "Io la vidi", which was salvaged from the omitted first act but with some different music and different text to reflect his current situation. In the four-act version he already knows that he cannot marry Elisabeth. In the original, when singing the aria, he was still expecting to marry her]

A monk resembling Carlo Quinto offers him eventual consolation of peace through God, an early herald of one of the opera's themes. Carlos greets his great friend Rodrigue, Marquis of Posa, who has just arrived from the oppressed land of Flanders (Aria: "J'étais en Flandres").

[This was cut during the pre-première rehearsals]

Posa asks for the Infante's aid on behalf of the suffering people there. Carlos reveals that he loves his stepmother. Posa is sympathetic but encourages him to leave Spain and go to Flanders. The two men swear eternal friendship (Duet: "Dieu, tu semas dans nos âmes" / "Dio, che nell'alma infondere"). King Philip and his new wife, with their attendants, enter also to do homage at Charles V's tomb, while Don Carlos laments his lost love.

Scene 2: A garden near Saint-Just

Princess Eboli sings the Veil Song ("Au palais des fées" / "Nel giardin del bello") about a Moorish King and an alluring veiled beauty that turned out to be his neglected wife. Elisabeth enters. Posa gives her a letter from France together, secretly, with a note from Don Carlos. At his urging (Aria: "L'Infant Carlos, notre espérance" / "Carlo ch'è sol il nostro amore"), Elisabeth agrees to see the Infante alone. Unaware of this relationship, Eboli infers that she, Eboli, is the one Don Carlos loves.

When they are alone, Don Carlos tells Elisabeth that he is miserable, and asks her to request Philip to send him to Flanders. She promptly agrees, provoking Carlos to renew his declarations of love, which she piously rejects. Don Carlos exits in a frenzy, shouting that he must be under a curse. The King enters and becomes angry because the Queen is alone and unattended. He orders the lady-in-waiting who was meant to be attending her, the Countess of Aremberg, to return to France, prompting Elizabeth to sing a sorrowful goodbye-aria. (Aria: "Oh ma chère compagne" / "Non pianger, mia compagna"). The King approaches Posa, with whose character and activism he is impressed, intent on rewarding him. Posa begs the King to stop oppressing the people of Flanders. The King calls Posa's idealism unrealistic and warns that the Grand Inquisitor is watching him. Philip confides in Posa, telling him that he fears that Carlos is having an affair with Elisabeth. Posa replies that Carlos is innocent, and offers to watch Elisabeth and to be responsible for her good behavior. Phillip gratefully accepts this offer, and again warns Posa to beware of the Grand Inquisitor.

[This dialogue was revised three times by Verdi.]

 

Act 3

[This is Act 2 in the 1883 revision]

Scene 1: Evening in the Queen's garden in Madrid

Elisabeth is tired, and wishes to concentrate on the following day's coronation of the King. To avoid the divertissement planned for the evening, she exchanges masks with Eboli, assuming that thereby her absence will not be noticed, and leaves.

[This scene was omitted from the 1883 revision]

[In the première, the ballet (choreographed by Lucien Petipa and entitled "La Pérégrina") took place at this point]

Don Carlos enters, clutching a note suggesting a tryst in the gardens. Although he thinks this is from Elisabeth, it is really from Eboli. Don Carlos mistakes her for Elisabeth in the dark, and passionately declares his love. When Eboli discloses her identity and that she now knows his secret - that he was expecting the Queen - Carlos is horrified. When Posa enters, she threatens to tell the King that Elisabeth and Carlos are lovers. Posa draws his dagger, intending to stab Eboli to death, but reconsiders, spares her, and places his trust in the Lord. Eboli exits in a vengeful rage. Posa advises Carlos to entrust to him any sensitive political documents that he may have and, when Carlos agrees, they reaffirm their friendship.

Scene 2: In front of the Cathedral of Valladolid

Preparations are being made for an "Auto-da-fé", the public parade and burning of condemned heretics. While the people celebrate, monks drag the condemned to the woodpile. A royal procession follows, with the King addressing the populace. Don Carlos interrupts it by bringing forward six Flemish envoys, who plead with the King for their country's freedom. Although the people and the court are sympathetic, the King, supported by the monks, orders the deputies' arrest. Carlos demands that the King grant him authority to govern Flanders; the King refuses. Carlos draws his sword against the King. The King calls for help but the guards will not attack Don Carlos. Posa steps in and takes the sword from Carlos. The King uses it to dub Posa Duke, the woodpile is fired and, as the flames start to rise, a heavenly voice can be heard promising heavenly peace to the condemned souls.

 

Act 4

[This is Act 3 in the 1883 revision]

Scene 1: Dawn in King Philip's study in Madrid

Alone, the King, in a reverie, laments that Elisabeth has never loved him, that his position means that he has to be eternally vigilant and – returning to a central theme – that he will only sleep properly when he is in his tomb in the Escorial (Aria: "Elle ne m'aime pas" / "Ella giammai m'amò"). The blind, ninety-year-old Grand Inquisitor is announced and shuffles into Philip's apartment. When the King asks if the Church will object to him putting his own son to death, the Inquisitor replies that the King will be in good company: God sacrificed His own son. In return for his support, the Inquisitor demands that the King have Posa killed. The King refuses to kill his friend, whom he admires and likes. However, the Grand Inquisitor reminds Philip that the Inquisition can take down any king; he has created and destroyed other rulers before. Somewhat taken aback, the King suggests the Grand Inquisitor forget about the past discussion. The latter replies "Peut-être" / "Forse!" – perhaps! – and leaves. The King bitterly muses on his helplessness to oppose the Church. In a moment of continuing high drama, Elisabeth enters, alarmed at the apparent theft of her jewel casket. However, the King produces it and points to the portrait of Don Carlos which it contains, accusing her of adultery. She protests her innocence but, when the King threatens her, she faints. In response to his calls for help, into the chamber come Eboli and Posa. Their laments of suspicion ("Maudit soit le soupçon infâme" / "Ah, sii maledetto, sospetto fatale"), cause the King to realise that he has wronged his wife. Posa then resolves to save Carlos, though it may mean his own death. Eboli feels remorse for betraying Elisabeth; the latter, recovering, expresses her despair.

[This quartet was revised by Verdi in 1883]

Elisabeth and Eboli are left together.

[Duet: "J'ai tout compris", was cut before the première]

Eboli confesses that not only did she steal the casket because she loved Carlos and that he had rejected her, but also because she has been the King's mistress. Elisabeth takes this in her stride and tells Eboli that she must go into exile or enter a convent. After she exits, Eboli curses the fatal pride that her beauty has bestowed on her, chooses the convent over exile and resolves to try and save Carlos from the Inquisition (Aria: "O don fatal" / "O don fatale").

Scene 2: A prison

Don Carlos has been imprisoned. Posa arrives to tell him that he will be saved but that he himself will have to die, incriminated by the politically sensitive documents which he had asked Carlos to entrust to him (Aria, part 1: "C'est mon jour suprême" / "Per me giunto è il dì supremo"). A shadowy figure appears and shoots Posa in the chest. As he dies, Posa tells Carlos that Elisabeth will meet him at Saint-Just the following day. He adds that he is content to die if his friend can save Flanders and rule over a happier Spain (Aria, part 2: "Ah, je meurs, l'âme joyeuse" / "Io morrò, ma lieto in core"). At that moment, Philip enters, offering his son freedom. Carlos repulses him for having murdered Posa. The King has not noticed that Posa is dead and cries out in sorrow.

[Duet: Carlos and the King- "Qui me rendra ce mort ?" /"Chi rende a me quest'uom" It was cut before the première and, following it, Verdi authorized its optional removal. The music was later re-used by Verdi for the Lacrimosa of his Messa da Requiem of 1874]

Bells ring as Elisabeth, Eboli and the Grand Inquisitor arrive. The crowd pushes its way into the prison and threatens the King, demanding the release of Carlos and, in the confusion, Eboli escapes with Carlos. Although the people are brave enough in the presence of the King, they are terrified by the Grand Inquisitor, instantly submitting to his angry command to quiet down and pay homage to Philip.

[After the première, some productions ended this act with the death of Posa. However, in 1883 Verdi provided a much shortened version of the insurrection, as he felt that otherwise it would not be clear how Eboli had fulfilled her promise to rescue Carlos]

 

Act 5

[This is Act 4 in the 1883 revision]

The moonlit monastery of Yuste

Elisabeth kneels before the tomb of Charles V. She is committed to help Don Carlos on his way to fulfill his destiny in Flanders, but she herself longs only for death (Aria: "Toi qui sus le néant" / "Tu che le vanità"). Carlos appears and they say a final farewell, promising to meet again in Heaven (Duet: "Au revoir dans un monde où la vie est meilleure" / "Ma lassù ci vedremo in un mondo migliore").

[This duet was twice revised by Verdi]

Philip and the Grand Inquisitor enter. The King infers that Carlos and Elisabeth have been lovers and demands that they both be immediately killed in a double sacrifice. The Inquisitor confirms that the Inquisition will do its duty. A short summary trial follows, confirming Carlos's putative culpability.

[The trial was omitted in 1883 and does not occur on any recording]

Carlos, calling on God, draws his sword to defend himself against the Inquisitor's guards, when a mysterious figure (the Monk) suddenly emerges from the tomb of Charles V. He grabs Carlos by the shoulder, loudly proclaiming that the turbulence of the world persists even in the Church; once again, we cannot rest except in Heaven. Philip and the Inquisitor recognize the Monk's voice: he is the King's father, Charles V. Everyone screams in shock and terror, while the Monk drags Carlos into the tomb and closes the entrance.

Program and cast

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Pavol Breier, 2018
© Pavol Breier, 2018
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© Pavol Breier, 2018
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© Pavol Breier, 2018

Slovak National Theatre - SND, New Building

The New Building of the Slovak National Theatre was designed by the architects Martin Kusý, Pavol Paňák and Peter Bauer. Their proposal won the competition that brought together fifty-three projects. The building stretches over seven stories. It houses over two thousand rooms and three main halls (The Opera and Ballet Stage, and the Drama Stage, and The Studio). The building is also home to a restaurant seating 1,200, a club, café, libresso and a kitchen.

The noble feel of the building is further enhanced by a number of outdoor and indoor art pieces. A fountain by Alexander Biľkovič, Iľja Skoček and Pavol Bauer is located in the front court. The entrance lobby prides itself with the Spring by the architect Pavol Bauer and the painter Dušan Buřil. The splendour of the front is further enhanced by the cascade by peter Roller and two towers by the architect Pavol Bauer. In addition to these works that are part of the building, the indoor areas are often decorated with theatre costumes and exhibitions.

SND New Building opened on 14 April 2007 at 7PM. The opening ceremony was attended by the then President of Slovakia Ivan Gašparovič and Minister of Culture Marek Maďarič.

 

How to get there

 

The venue opens to visitors one hour prior to the beginning of the performance.

 

BY CAR 

Visitors attending any SND performance are welcome to park free of charge, on the parking lot adjacent to the theatre.

 

PUBLIC TRANSPORT 

The public transport lines that take you to the SND are bus lines No 28, 50, 70, 78, 88, 95, 133, 801 and tram lines No 2, 4, 5 & 6 that stop at the square Šafárikovo námestie, as well as the trolleybus line No 210.

 

Buses

Bus stop SND New Building (adjacent to the SD New Building):
Bus line No 28
Bus line No 133
Bus line No 801 (international bus line)

Bus stop Landererova (adjacent to the SND New Building): 
Bus line No 50 (from the direction OD Slimák)
Bus line No 88
Bus line No 95

Bus stop Malá scéna (within walking distance):
Bus line No 70
Bus line No 78

Bus line No 50 (in the direction from the Aupark)
Bus line No 28 (also servicing the bus stop SND New Building/Nová budova SND)
Bus line No 95 (also servicing the bus stop Landererova)
Bus line No 133 (also servicing the bus stop SND New Building/ Nová budova SND)

 

Trams
Tram stop Šafárikovo námestie (within walking distance)

Tram lines No 2, 4, 5 & 6 (an option to transfer to bus lines No 95 – stop Malá scéna, and/or Landererova, No 78 – stop Malá scéna)

 

Trolleybus:
Stop Nová budova SND/ SND New Building (adjacent to the SND New Building):

Trolleybus stop Ni 210 (in the direction from the main train Station/ Hlavná stanica Bratislava – stop Nová budova SND ( SND New Building)

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